AUDIO: ‘6yr olds should be able to cycle safely’

Almost 70 % of people in Britain would support greater cycling route provisions in their local area, results of a YouGov survey show.

YouGov

The Royal Society for the Prevention of Accidents (RoSPA) revealed these figures at the start of their Family Safety Week.

The poll involved 2,169 people participating online. 58% of them said they never cycle.

Nazan Fennell, leading the Live in Hope campaign in Birmingham has urged families to demand for safer cycling infrastructure in the city:

“After Hope’s accident I realised that things could be done to prevent these fatalities. We need to make our roads safer for vulnerable users”

 

13 year old Hope Fennell was knocked off her bike by a lorry and killed in 2011 in Kings Heath.

 

RoSPa launched the campaign at the Queensbridge school, where Hope was a pupil, and a national cycling survey to collect data from cyclists, non-cyclists and would-have-been cyclist.

More details on the YouGov survey are available at Bike Boom by Carlton Reid.  

very unsafeUPDATE: This post has been updated, after it was pointed out to us that 15% of the respondents of the poll said their local roads are ‘very’ unsafe.

 

2 Brum-London trains among top 10 most crowded

Two of the 10 most overcrowded trains in England and Wales are on the Birmingham New Street-London Euston lines.

The 20:17 and 20:03 trains were the most over crowded trains, spring 2013 data from the Department for Transport has revealed.

Main findings of the report for Birmingham said:

  • On an average 39,000 passengers arrive into Central Birmingham during the morning peak hours, the highest outside of London.
  • At the trains busiest points, 9.0% passengers were standing during the morning peak hours and 8.5% during the afternoon peak hours.

Passenger numbers have increased since 2012, when disruption of the London Midlands services had led to a reduced demand.

Rail passenger numbers and crowding on weekdays in England and Wales in 2013

Rail passenger numbers and crowding on weekdays in England and Wales in 2013. SOURCE: Department for Transport

AM peak arrivals is the number of passengers arriving into the city centre by national rail on a typical autumn weekday during the three hour morning peak (7 – 10am). 

Peak PiXC is the percentage of passengers in excess of capacity (PiXC) across the morning and evening peaks on a typical autumn weekday. It is the main measure of crowding in these statistics. A higher PiXCpercentage represents a worse crowding level.

Research: West Midlands among best in country for rail services

This post was originally published on the Transport Network. Shared here and on Eastside, are some more details on the data revealed from the research on regional rail performance

According to it, London, West Midlands and the North West are the best performing rail regions in terms of overall services, while the East of England and Wales remain low on accessibility.


Overall benchmarking scores put West Midlands and the North West at second place with 50%. London stood at first place here, with 59%.


In terms of growth and usage, London was the highest at 73%, followed by the South East at 56% and the West Midlands at 51%. Factors analysed were trips per head, 10-year growth rate and rail mode share.

The research – Benchmarking Rail Services Across Great Britain - was carried out by consultants, Credo, in association with Campaign for Better Transport.

DfT recommends industry and local government learn from the report.

Peter Wilkinson, director of franchising, Department for Transport said:

“There are challenges for all regions in improving performance. The industry and local government must consider how we best work together to tackle the issues this report raises.”


However, on the service quality front, both London and the West Midlands were quite low with 36% and 41% respectively, compared to the highest scores in Scotland at 55%.


Accessibility scores remain high for London at 68%, followed by the West Midlands at 57%, despite having low value for money scores. East of England emerged the lowest in this category at 17%.

Scottish rail services – which operate under a devolved management for the Scotrail franchise – showed high passenger satisfaction, while Welsh rail services had relatively low levels of usage, accessibility and satisfaction, including the second lowest level for accessibility at 22%.

The research recommends focus on passenger satisfaction around key themes of station cleanliness, security, investments on fleet modernisation and locally identified fare subsidies.

If you have more ideas or questions/comments on improving the presentation of this data, please get in touch @brumtransport

Birmingham one of the worst in the country for car crimes

Figures from the West Midlands Police show Birmingham is the 7th in a list of worst cities in the country for car crimes.

The data was released this morning by HONESTJOHN.CO.UK as a part of a Freedom of Information (FOI) request they filed with 42 police forces in the country.

Between October 2011 and September 2012, around 313 offences per 10,000 vehicles were reported in Central Birmingham. The national average is 121 offences per 10,000 vehicles.

Car crime hotspots in Birmingham

The city centre area of Birmingham is one of the hotspots for car break ins and other crimes with 1800 offences per 10,000 cars.

The West Midlands has a large number of car crime areas including Birmingham, Dudley and Wolverhampton. Central Coventry also has quite high crime rate with 434 offences recorded in its city centre.

Nationally, Manchester has the highest car crime rates, with figures at 505 crimes per 10,000 vehicles.

More details on the types of offences recorded, statistics from more than 40 police forces in the country are available on the HONEST JOHN crime segment

Soon to follow: Audio interview with David Ross, new cars editor, HONESTJOHN.CO.UK

West Midlands passengers feel the most unsafe

Bus passengers in the West Midlands feel more unsafe than in any other region, a recent report reveals.

It is the second year in a row that the West Midlands Passenger Transport Executive (WMPTE) region has come out with the highest number of passengers feeling unsafe.

More than one in six respondents (17 per cent) to the Bus Passenger Survey 2013 said that the behaviour of other passengers had given them cause to worry or make them feel uncomfortable.

The independent watchdog, Passenger Focus carried out the survey for autumn 2012 in 22 regions in the country outside London. Data was collected between 23 September and 12 December, 2012 (excluding the half term holiday period).

However, with the fatal stabbing of a teenager on a bus in Birmingham earlier on 7 March, this perception of safety is likely to be even lower now.

At the second spot is the Greater Manchester region with the figure at 13 per cent.

The overall satisfaction of passengers with their journey has also fallen from 81 per cent last year to 79 per cent this year in the WMPTE region.

The number of female passengers experiencing anti-social behavior has gone up from 15 to 16 per cent. Figures about perception of security inside the buses are the same in the last two years.

Anthony Smith, Passenger Focus chief executive, has said in a press statement:

“Each year some 2.3 billion bus journeys are made in England outside of London. Passengers are not satisfied with around 375 million journeys. We hope this report will be a call to action for transport authorities and bus companies to better work together to improve things for passengers.”

Low level nuisance behaviour such as playing loud music, feet on seats, boisterous antics, smoking are some of the frequent complains, said a spokesperson from public transport authority Centro.

Phil Tonks, an independent transport consultant said:

“There is obviously work to be done on improving perceptions of local bus services. The Safer Travel Team also continues to reduce crime and anti-social behaviour on our buses. However, it is clear that other aspects of the journey experience need improvement.”

 

UPDATE: This post from Brum Transport was later published in the Birmingham Mail’s datablog Behind the Numbers